Buddhism: 12 Painful Facts

Buddhism: 12 Painful Facts

  1. Both Theravada Buddhism and Mahayana Buddhism are founded upon irrational superstitions, myths, and primitive beliefs, like the existence of Hindu gods, supernatural beings, reincarnation, past lives, supernatural karma, etc…[1]
  1. The Pali Canon, the earliest collection of Buddhist scriptures, was written centuries after Gautama Buddha was alleged to have lived and are unreliable with regards to ascertaining what the Buddha taught, as they fail the historical test of contemporaneity. [2]
  1. Buddha’s recorded refutation of the existence of a creator God completely hinges on an equally irrational premise, i.e., that the first soul who reincarnated into the “World of Radiance” (Heaven) became lonely and wanted company, and when the next soul reincarnated there, the first thought he had brought the second into existence, and the second believed that the former was Brahma (God). [3]
  1. Early Buddhism, as evinced within the teachings in the Pali Canon, was very misogynistic and exhibits the base and nascent gender inequality of a less enlightened era. [4]
  1. The Mahayana scriptures which form the foundation of Mahayana Buddhism were written close to half a millennium after Gautama Buddha was alleged to have lived and the story about their late “discovery” holds that Buddha hid them in a supernatural realm inhabited by serpent beings, thus rendering them historically unreliable and almost certainly not representative of the actual teachings of Buddha. [5]
  1. The Mahayana scriptures contradict the Buddha’s teachings in numerous and fundamental ways, which is why the Second Buddhist Council was initially held. [6]
  1. Although the history of Buddhism isn’t marred by the same level of violence as the histories of Christianity and Islam, it still employed violence, persecution, and destructive conquests to spread in countries like Tibet, for example. [7]
  1. The tradition of the Dalai Lama would have looked completely alien to the Buddha, because the Dalai Lama is believed to be the incarnation of the Bodhisattva named Avalokiteśvara, yet, according to early Buddhism, such Bodhisattvas didn’t exist, and the term Bodhisattva (Pali: ‘Bodhisatta’) was a term used exclusively to describe the past lives of the Buddha. [8]
  1. If not for the Gelug (Yellow Hat) school of Tibetan Buddhism’s cunning alliance with Tibet’s violent and powerful patrons, the Mongolian Khan Dynasty, the tradition of the Dalai Lama would probably not exist today. [9]
  1. Before China’s tyrannical annexation of Tibet, Tibet was a brutal theocracy in which the common people were reduced to slavery and poor thieves had their hands cut off in similitude to modern Islamic states. In the words of Columbia University’s Director of Modern Tibetan Studies, Prof. Robert Barnett: ‘Before 1959, all except 5 percent of the Tibetan population were slaves or serfs in a feudal system in which they were regarded as saleable private property, had no land or freedom, and were subject to punishment by mutilation or amputation [from both the 1989 and 2001 editions].’[10]
  1. Notwithstanding a few original doctrines like the non-existence of the self (‘anatta’) and the impermanence of all things (‘anicca’), Buddhism is just a rehashing of its parent religion, Hinduism. [11]
  1. Mindfulness meditation is central to Buddhist practice and it was the means by which the Buddha perceived all of his past lives, yet a recent neuroscientific study has demonstrated that practicing this form of meditation causes practitioners to conflate imagined memories with actual memories. This is a significant find, for it supports the common-sense-conclusion that the Buddha probably only imagined his past lives, a fact which has serious ramifications for the supposed “truths” of core Buddhist doctrines and principles. [12]

 

End Notes:

  1. Maha-samaya Sutta (trans. Thanissaro Bhikkhu), 1997, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.20.0.than.html, accessed 17 July 2015; Anon, A Sketch of the Buddha’s Life: Readings from the Pali Canon, 2005, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/buddha.html, accessed 17 July 2015; Maha-samaya Sutta (trans. Thanissaro Bhikkhu), 1997, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.20.0.than.html, accessed 17 July 2015; Maha-Saccaka Sutta (trans. Thanissaro Bhikkhu), 2008, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.036.than.html, accessed on 21 2015.
  1. Robert E. Buswell, Jr., ‘Encyclopedia of Buddhism’, New York, 2004, pp. 625-626; Bart Ehrman, ‘Jesus Interrupted’ Harper-Collins Publishers, 2005, p. 145.
  1. Nyanaponika Thera, ‘Buddhism and the God-Idea: Selected Texts’, Wheel Publication No. 47, 2008, p. 5.
  1. Robert E. Buswell, Jr., ‘Encyclopedia of Buddhism’, New York, 2004, p. 303; Diana Y. Paul, ‘Women in Buddhism: Images of the Feminine in Mahayana Buddhism’, Los Angeles, 1985, p. 281.
  1. John Powers, ‘Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, Rev. Ed.,’ New York, 1995, p. 102; Paul Williams, ‘Mahayana Buddhism: The Doctrinal Foundations, 2nd, New York, 1989, pp. 63-64; Ronald M. Davidson, ‘Indian Esoteric Buddhism: A Social History of the Tantric Movement’, New York, 2002, p. 241.
  1. Robert E. Buswell, Jr., ‘Encyclopedia of Buddhism’, New York, 2004, p. 837; Hirakawa Akira (Trans. Paul Groner), ‘A History of Indian Buddhism: From Sakyamuni to Early Mahayana’, Delhi, 1993, p. 79.
  1. Robert E. Buswell, Jr., ‘Encyclopedia of Buddhism’, New York, 2004, pp. 66-67, 643.
  1. Damien Keown, ‘Buddhism (A Brief Insight)’, New York, 1996, pp. 93, 111; Naomi Appleton, ‘Jataka Stories in Theravada Buddhism: Narrating the Bodhisatta Path’, Surrey, England, 2010, p. 22.
  1. H. the Dalai Lama, in Tantra in Tibet, tr. Jeffrey Hopkins (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1977), p. 69, cited in: John Powers, ‘Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism, Rev. Ed.,’ New York, 1995. pp. 164-165.
  1. Melvyn C. Goldstein,Journal of Asian Studies, Cambridge, May 1971, pp. 521-34, cited at: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7145508&fileId=S0021911800154816, accessed on 21 Oct. 2015; Robert Barnett, ‘Tibetan Buddhism in the West: Problems of Adoption and Cross-Cultural Confusion’, cited at: http://info-buddhism.com/Human-Rights-in-Tibet-before-1959_Robert_Barnett.html, accessed on 21 Oct. 2015.
  1. For example: Time as a cycle: Douglas Pratt, ‘Religion: A First Encounter’, Auckland, N.Z., 1993, pp. 195, 214; Reincarnation: C.S. Prebish & D. Keown, ‘Buddhism: The Ebook’, 3rd, 2006, p. 27; Brahma and Hindu deities: Maha-samaya Sutta (trans. Thanissaro Bhikkhu), 1997, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.20.0.than.html, accessed 17 July 2015; Anon, A Sketch of the Buddha’s Life: Readings from the Pali Canon, 2005, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/ptf/buddha.html, accessed 17 July 2015; Maha-samaya Sutta (trans. Thanissaro Bhikkhu), 1997, cited at: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.20.0.than.html, accessed 17 July 2015.

 

  1. ‘Maha Satipatthana Sutta: The Great Discourse on Steadfast Mindfulness’ (Trans. U Jotika & U Dhammindap), Buddha Dharma Education Association, Inc., p. 7, cited at: http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/mahasati.pdf, accessed on 19th Sept, 2015; Samyutta Nikaya 35.204, cited in: I. A. Reed (ed.), The Collection of Connected Discourses (Saµyutta Nikåya) Part One 5 The Book of Connected Discourses with Verses (Sagåthåvaggasaµyuttapå¬i)’, 30, cited at: http://www.visuddha-m-c.com/vmc%20sg/books%20doc/Bhikkhu%20Bodhi%20Books/Samyutta%20Nikaya.pdf, accessed on 21st Sept, 2015; Mindfulness May Make Memories Less Accurate: Neuroscience News – http://neurosciencenews.com/false-memory-mindful-meditation-psychology-2605/, accessed on 21 Oct. 2015.

7 thoughts on “Buddhism: 12 Painful Facts

  1. this cunt need to more research cos tesla & einstein both agreed that buddhism as a phylosophy is the only thing that they can explain their work.

  2. Very interesting. I have an issue with your point 10 though: you reproduced Barnett’s quotation, which appears at the beginning of the second webpage in your reference 10 but then the rest of that article refutes most of that quotation, attributing the idea of widespread punishment by mutilation to Chinese propaganda basically.

  3. All organized religions and forms of Buddhism are corrupt and equally inherently full of cultural and societal bias.
    What stands out from this article asides from how humans corrupt any power structure, is that once again, even the greatest spiritual teachings are draped in human garbage and baggage.
    Learning about what is known about Buddha and his teachings require a discerning stance so that one may gleam perhaps the greatest spiritual truths available from any one ism in history.

  4. People love their gods, even their demons. It’s true that Buddhism didn’t totally expunge such supernationalism but that is to do with upaya, with expedient means. To bring people suddenly into a cosmos, a world view, with no supernaturalim, no mythic beliefs whatsoever, would be leaving a lot of people behind.

    The story of Shakyamuni dispelling Mara and his demons is just that a story. A metaphorical way of describing ridding oneself of extraneous supernatural, mythic, and metaphysical beliefs. That some Buddhists to this day still take this story to be literally true is a testimony to Buddhist upaya – the compassion and wisdom to include all regardless of where they are on the path.

  5. Your point no.10 is impressively misleading. Its essentially the most perverse form of misrepresentation of Tibet’s history, like it was copied directly from one of the old Chinese propoganda pamphlets.

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